Tech Games

Who is Amy Allwine?

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Five years after killing his wife Amy, her enigmatic husband Stephen Allwine believes he was the victim of a high-tech framing.

“When you look at all the scientific data when you look at the hard physical proof, I couldn’t have done it if you know me as an individual. I couldn’t have done it,” Allwine remarked.A jury found Allwine guilty of first-degree murder in the November 13, 2016, shooting death of a 17-year-old girl. When Allwine’s plot to hire a hitman on the “Dark Net” failed, he killed his wife and staged the crime scene to look like a suicide, according to prosecutors and police.

In the chapel of Stillwater Prison, where Allwine is receiving a life term, he gave his first interview to the FOX 9 Investigators.

On the other hand, Allwine argued that overwhelming computer forensic evidence uncovered on 64 electronic devices retrieved from the Allwine residence in Cottage Grove threw doubt on his innocence.

As Allwine puts it, the real assassin planted evidence on his technological devices to make him look guilty. He claims that tangible evidence at the scene of the crime could have cleared his name.

According to those concerned in the case, Allwine is a convicted felon.

In this instance, Mark Lanterman, a computer forensics expert who studied electronic devices for the prosecution, concluded that the evidence was “overwhelming”.

‘I would say this is perhaps the most convincing case I’ve ever worked on in the previous 30 years,’ Lanterman continued.

As Lanterman discovered, at least two women Allwine met on the adultery site Ashley Madison were having love encounters with him. Allwine did not discuss the affairs.

Courtroom testimony showed that Stephen, an elder in his church, killed Amy because a divorce jeopardized that position.

Plot to Get Someone Else to Do Something Bad Discovered

Stephen and Amy Allwine appeared to have lived a life dedicated to their faith and their family from the outside. Their love blossomed in a Christian college, and they got married soon afterward.

Stephen rose through the ranks of his church to the positions of deacon and information technology specialist. Across the muddy road from their Cottage Grove houss.

A Cottage Grove police detective and an FBI agent met Amy and Stephen Allwine in May 2016 and informed them that someone was trying to assassinate Amy.

In the case at hand, the FBI relied on a cache of emails obtained from an anonymous source on the “Dark Net,” a portion of the internet accessible only through the use of the Tor browser. There are many relay servers worldwide, making it difficult to track activities on the Dark Net.

Emails retrieved by the FBI were from Besa Mafia, a Dark Net site claiming to furnish paid Albanian contract murderers.

This website received an anonymous email on February 14th from someone going by the handle ‘dogdayGod.’

First, “I am interested in hiring your services, but what is the best approach to transfer cash into bitcoin anonymously?” stated the initial email from ‘dogdayGod.’

Amy Allwine’s name was mentioned in several more letters negotiating payment in bitco andas a variety of possible assassination situations.

Anonymous dogdayGod commented, “This bitch has ripped my family apart by sleeping with my husband (who then left me) and is taking customers from my business.”

Someone might have mistaken Stephen Allwine’s wife for another Amy. As far as he can tell, Amy was interrogated by the FBI on her own, and they never considered him to be a suspect.

“Based on the evidence I’ve seen, I believe I know who committed the crime. I can track it back to a colleague of hers. “Allwine said this.

It is believed that Stephen Allwine’s intention from the outset was to frame someone else for the murder and divert attention away from himself.

Fingerprints on a Digital Scale

On Allwine’s electronic equipment, the computer forensic expert Lanterman identified a trail of digital breadcrumbs that mirrors the transactions of the anonymous dogdayGod on the Dark Net.

Lanterman employed more than 70 data points to build parallel timelines that were almost completely in sync.

“My understanding is that Mr. Allwine is an IT guy by profession, and we have egos,” Lanterman stated. “Mr. Allwine, on the other hand, seemed to think he was smarter than everyone else. Fortunately, this wasn’t the case.”

dogdayGod contacted Besa Mafia while Stephen Allwine was looking for bitcoin for the first time on February 14, 2016, Valentine’s Day.

Amy will be attending a dog training convention in Moline, Illinois, on February 15th, and Allwine will be researching her travel plans and calculating the distance from Chicago.

DogdayGod tells the Besa mafia two minutes later, “The target is going to Moline, which is about a three-hour trip away from Chicago. In bitcoin, how much would it cost to get hit and make it look like an accident?”

Stephen and Amy are vacationing in Hawaii when DogdayGod sends them an image of Amy from their home server, just as Stephen is downloading the same image.

Before leaving for his cell block, Allwine remarked, “For justice to be done in this scenario, you need to bring to justice the person who was responsible,” Allwine added.

Lanterman, who believes he has a greater understanding of Allwine because of his rigorous examination of Allwine’s digital life, is sceptical.

Lanterman said, “I think he’s arrogant.” “He did it. And he’s having a hard time taking on that role of being responsible for it. A coward, he’s it.”

 

 

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